stunning kitchen room design with large bar style island and coffered ceiling

Coffered Ceiling Design Ideas To Add Value To Your Home

Erin Gobler5-Minute Read
May 05, 2022

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When you’re looking for upgrades that can add value to your home, there is no shortage of options. One that many people consider is a coffered ceiling, which can transform your ceiling into an elegant, timeless and aesthetically pleasing display.

Coffered ceilings are a popular feature in many of today’s homes. And even if your home doesn’t currently have this design element, you can go back and add one later, either by hiring a contractor or making it a DIY project.

In this article, we’ll share more about what a coffered ceiling is, how much it costs to add to your home and some coffered ceiling ideas to provide inspiration.

What Is A Coffered Ceiling?

A coffered ceiling is an architectural design that consists of sunken panels in the shape of polygons, rectangles and even circular patterns. This design feature dates back several centuries and was originally developed in Rome.

Coffered ceilings are also referred to as sunken ceilings. They are made with panels attached to a suspended drop grid that brings out depth, dimension and architectural interest. Coffers (the recessed part of coffered ceilings) can be made in a variety of sizes and shapes to fit any ceiling.

This type of ceiling is most common in commercial spaces, but has become increasingly popular in residential designs, especially in larger rooms. Though coffered ceilings originated with Renaissance and Baroque architecture, modern innovations make it simple to introduce the look into most homes, regardless of the style.

Coffered Ceiling Designs And Patterns

Coffered ceilings come in a variety of design styles, so homeowners can choose the design that works best for the look they’re trying to achieve. Here are a few of the most popular types of coffered ceilings:

  • Boxed: This is the most classic coffered ceiling look and features hollow beams affixed to the ceiling to create a repeating box pattern.
  • Polygon: This ceiling features a large shape in the center of the room with straight beams of coffers reaching out to the edges of the room.
  • Diagonal: This has the coffers turned 90 degrees to create a diagonal effect resembling diamonds.
  • Grid: This design is suspended or dropped from an existing ceiling to create a false one that’s often referred to as a T-bar ceiling.

How Much Does A Coffered Ceiling Cost?

According to HomeAdvisor, it usually costs $3,000 – $4,500 to install a coffered ceiling in your home, with $3,750 being the average cost. You’ll generally pay $20 – $30 per square foot for the basic build, and more for any decorative accents, tin tiles, crown molding and other features you want.

Of course, the cost of a coffered ceiling can vary based on several factors, including the size of the space, the materials you choose, your labor costs and more. Below are a handful of factors that may affect your pricing.

  • Materials: The cost of installing a coffered ceiling will depend heavily on the materials you choose. PVC, plywood and fiberboard are some of the cheaper materials available, while real hardwood will be more expensive.
  • Ceiling height and square footage: Projects like coffered ceilings are often priced per square foot. As a result, the larger the space and the higher the ceiling, the more expensive the job is likely to be.
  • Coffered ceiling pattern: As we mentioned, there are several designs to choose from. Some of those can be more expensive than others due to the materials and labor required.
  • Design elements: Adding additional design elements and accents to your coffered ceiling can increase the cost. Elements you might add include new light fixtures, paint or trip, molding.
  • Installation and labor: If you’re hiring a professional to install your coffered ceiling, then you’ll have to contend with installation and labor costs, which will vary depending on your location and the company you hire to do the job.

If you’re in the market for a coffered ceiling, be sure to visit HomeAdvisor and get a quote to see how much it would cost to hire a professional to do the job.

Coffered Ceiling Design Ideas

Coffered ceilings have become a popular design element in many residential homes, and homeowners can choose from many design ideas to make the feature fit their style. Below are some coffered ceiling design ideas to consider for your home.

Industrial

Industrial interior design takes many of the architectural elements of a home that someone may try to hide and instead makes them the focal point. An industrial coffered ceiling like the one shown below might incorporate wood and metal elements to create a warehouse look.

Industrial Coffered Ceiling

Farmhouse

The farmhouse style has been popular in home design for years. This aesthetic aims to create a rustic-looking space that’s simple and practical, while still being modern and stylish. Like in the image below, a coffered ceiling in a farmhouse-style home is likely to include wood elements that are compatible with other wood throughout the home.

Farmhouse Coffered Ceiling

Elegant

An elegant interior design look includes clean lines, tasteful accents and a simple yet sophisticated aesthetic. This type of design is easy to achieve with coffered ceilings, as the two go hand in hand.

Elegant Living Room

Sleek

Sleek interior design is all about minimalism. You’re likely to find simple and neutral design schemes that catch the eye. Rather than having a lot of things going on in the space, it’s the clean lines and the monochromatic color palette that catches your eye.

Sleek Living Room

Simple

Simple interior design helps to bring aesthetically pleasing elements to a space without making them overpowering. Like other design elements, the coffered ceiling in a home with a simple design is likely to be understated without standing out too much. It provides just a small amount of flair to the space.

Simple Living Room With Coffered Ceilings

Get a professional opinion.

Find local interior decorators to help on HomeAdvisor.

Popular Ways To Style Your Coffered Ceilings

Wondering how to style your coffered ceilings and take them to the next level? Here are just a few ideas to consider.

Add Bold Lighting

Coffers make your ceiling a focal point of the room. You might as well take advantage of that by installing bold light features. You can choose from various types of light fixtures like chandeliers, flush lights or recessed lighting.

Paint With Contrasting Colors

It’s important to consider the paint colors of both your walls and ceiling when installing coffers. Consider using contrasting colors to help your coffered ceiling pop even more.

Install Wood Beams 

Wood beams have long been a popular element in home design, and they make a great addition to coffered ceilings. Depending on the finish of the wood, you can use these beams to create a rustic or modern feel.

Add Them To Your Open Concept

When you have an open concept in your home, it’s easy for the rooms to run together. A coffered ceiling can help to distinguish between different spaces in an open concept. For example, you can use this ceiling feature to visually separate your living room from the kitchen.

The Bottom Line

Coffered ceilings are a popular trend in home design, and it’s easy to see why. They provide a focal point and some contrast to your space, while still offering a classic and elegant architectural look. If you’ve considered adding coffered ceilings or anything else to your home, check out more of this year’s popular interior design trends.

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Erin Gobler

Erin Gobler is a freelance personal finance expert and writer who has been publishing content online for nearly a decade. She specializes in financial topics like mortgages, investing, and credit cards. Erin's work has appeared in publications like Fox Business, NextAdvisor, Credit Karma, and more.